Essays on 1984 society

Feminist literary criticism interprets a text by looking at the way that women are portrayed. In 1984, women play key roles to develop Winston's character and lead him to his eventual fight for freedom. First, Winston's mother influenced Winston's decisions greatly. In Winston's youth, he was a "beastly little swine"(Orwell,171) to his mother, often stealing food and perpetrating violent acts towards her. After his mother's mysterious disappearance, he often feels remorseful that he was not able to reconcile their relationship. In addition, Winston feels that "in some way the lives of his mother and his sister had been sacrificed to his own"(Orwell,32). Winston feels guilty and thinks that he was the reason that his mother and sister had disappeared, and that "they must die in order that he might remain alive"(Orwell,32). Because of Winston's remorse, he often dreams of the past and longs for his mother. In his recollections of his youth, Winston is also reminiscing of a world where fundamental freedoms and individualism are still existent. "Tragedy, he perceived, belonged to the ancient time, to a time when there was still privacy, love and friendship"(Orwell,32). However, in Winston's present society, those virtues are unfamiliar to Winston. This causes Winston to resent the present society and gives him the motivation to be dissident in order to seek the freedoms of the past. Secondly, Julia also plays an important role in the eventual outcome of the novel. At first, Winston thinks that Julia is a "good party member, pure in word and deed"(Orwell,127). However, soon later, he discovers that Julia is unorthodox and has the same intentions and interests as him. Julia had said to Winston that "[she] ought to suit [him, because she is] corrupt to the bones"(Orwell,132), despite her previously deceitful appearance. This gives Winston the encouragement that other seemingly normal party members exist hidden with similar intentions, which eventually pushes Winston towards his acts of heresy. In addition, Winston and Julia secretly develop a relationship and have an affair, which is forbidden in their society. Their act of sexual intercourse was driven by "the animal instinct, the simple undifferentiated desire"(Orwell,132), instead of simply being "[their] duty to the party"(Orwell,70) as in the case with Winston's previous wife, Katherine. With this, Julia allows Winston to take his first steps in defying the party, eventually leading to much more serious acts. "It was a blow struck against the party. It was a political act"(Orwell,133), Winston explains. Furthermore, with the presence of Julia, being a free-spirited and rebellious recalcitrant, Winston begins to become more idiosyncratic and defiant in his actions and openly expresses his resentful thoughts towards Big Brother, ultimately escalating to his enrolment in the supposed Brotherhood and his downfall. Julia is the catalyst that moves Winston along in his intentions, and it is quite possible that without her, Winston would have never digressed from the norms and taken physical action against the party. This emphasizes Julia's importance in the plot. Because of Winston's mother and Julia's role in inciting Winston's struggle for freedom and pursuance of a more liberal society, a feminist critic would believe the meaning of the novel to be that women have a large effect on men's actions and society.

Essays on 1984 society

essays on 1984 society

Media:

essays on 1984 societyessays on 1984 societyessays on 1984 societyessays on 1984 society